New York Times Selected Navi Mumbai Man’s Crossword for July 4 Edition on Independence Day of USA

New York Times Selected Navi Mumbai Man’s Crossword for July 4 Edition on Independence Day of USA

NAVI MUMBAI: The New York Times has selected a Navi Mumbaikar’s crossword to be published on July 4, the Independence Day of USA.  The theme of the crossword created by Mangesh Ghogre, an alumnus of VJTI and NMIMS, is based on ‘Fourth of July’. Every crossword has a theme, which forms the longest answers in the puzzle. “I collaborated with an American crossword constructor to create this special puzzle. The underlying thought behind this puzzle was to prove how crosswords can cross national boundaries and bring people closer. This competition has got brought the two countries closer. To a certain extent, the Make in India campaign was responsible in encouraging my thought process,” said Ghogare.

The Nerul resident said that crossword editor at The New York Times, Will Shortz, was the one who selected his crossword months before the day when it is to be published. “He found the theme of my puzzle and the construction very elegant. This idea has not been attempted before,” added the 37-year-old investment banker.

Speaking about the cut-throat race to feature in the prestigious daily, Ghogre said, “The editor receives about 100 crossword submissions every week. Though crosswords are not so popular among youth any more, I always dreamt of using my puzzle skills to do something worthwhile. I have got an opportunity after twenty years of wait. I am quite content that I will get to entertain the US audience on such a special occasion.”

Ghogre is an international crossword constructor and his puzzles have been published in other iconic dailies like The Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times. He is the only Indian to have achieved such a feat. He has been invited to judge the American Crossword Tournament held in New York several times.
I collaborated with an American crossword constructor to create this puzzle. The underlying thought behind this puzzle was to prove how crosswords can cross national boundaries and bring people closer.

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